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A man hugging a women - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Magdalena Cuprys, Esq.
  • Published: March 1, 2023

What Is A Spouse Visa? A spouse or marriage visa in the United States is an immigration document that allows the husband or wife of a US citizen to live and work in the country. The IR1 and CR1 visas are the two types of spouse visas available in the United States. Differences Between IR1 And CR1 Visas The Immediate Relative (IR1) visa is for immigrant spouses who have been married for more than two years since entering the United States with an immigrant visa. Since the couple has already been married for a lengthy period, the immigrant spouse’s residence is unconditional and gets a Green Card for the next 10 years before, with the chance of renewal. The Conditional Resident (CR1) visa is for immigrant spouses who have been married for less than two years when they enter the United States with their visa. With this marriage visa, the spouse can move to the United States on a conditional basis. They will need to stay married for at…Read More

A man and women holding a flag - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Magdalena Cuprys, Esq.
  • Published: February 13, 2023

What Is A K1 Visa? A K1 fiancé (or fianceé) visa is an immigration document issued to the foreign fiancé or fiancée of a U.S. citizen. It allows them to enter the U.S. for 90 days for marriage. Once the couple gets married within those 90 days, they may apply for an adjustment of status so the foreign spouse may become a lawful permanent resident (green card holder). The K1 visa is one-entry-only. The K1 visa also benefits the immigrant spouse’s children younger than 21 years old and single, since they may apply for a K2 visa and also gain entry to the United States and live there. What Are The Requirements For The US K1 Visa? Both the U.S. citizen and the immigrant must be unmarried. The couple must have seen each other at least once within the last 2 years before making the K1 visa application. Both of them must marry within the United States. The marriage between both parties must take place…Read More

Christmas ball featuring Santa Claus and a reindeer - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: December 26, 2022

Millions of people migrate every year in search of a better future and the United States is the first in the list of the most chosen places to go and who wouldn’t like to live the American dream?! But a huge percentage of these people arrive illegally and alone because they cannot bring their family with them. But not everything is so bad, because there are also the friendly hands, those people you meet, who remind you that there are good people, who even though if you are not at home with your loved ones, they make you feel part of their family, they become your family and invite you to spend holidays with them. And how beautiful it is, for example. Christmas, that date in which more love and company is breathed in the atmosphere, that date that is to be with family, feel the warmth of home, make a toast and eat something delicious. But we are not talking about just any Christmas,…Read More

Halloween pumpkins, bats and spiders on a full moon background - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: December 26, 2022

Hands up anyone who dressed up as a child, and as an adult too (why not?). How fun it is to get ready for that one night of the year when you can be whoever you want and no one will judge you by what you wear, grab your bag to ask for candy, go out in the street, see more people in costumes and on the same vibe as you. But what would not be fun is if that night, which is intended to be “scary”, turns into your daily life, but without the costumes and candy, but days full of anxiety and insecurity because of your status as a non-legal immigrant. That is why it is important that you legalize your stay in the country, so you can go out with your family to enjoy this special and fun night that makes many children and adults happy, so that your children do not miss out on the activities that this day has to…Read More

Thanksgiving dinner spread with roasted turkey, vegetables - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: December 26, 2022

To be thankful, is one of the most important things that we are taught when we are growing up. “You have to give thanks,” our mothers used to say when someone gave us something or helped us with something. And in the United States there is a day dedicated especially to that, to give thanks. Thanksgiving Day has its origins in Canada, the tradition started to give thanks for the harvests of the season and for being able to share them. This is a day to share with the family, to celebrate and give thanks for what life has given us throughout the year. Every year millions of families reunite together to give thanks and no one should be an exception to that rule, but there are those who cannot be with their families because they had to emigrate and had to do it alone. The United States is the country that receives the majority number of immigrants each year, and part of those thousands…Read More

Ring in the new year with shiny gold digits - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: December 26, 2022

January 1st, the day when a new cycle begins, the day to make better decisions , whether in the short term or in the future, the day to say goodbye to the prev1ous year that gave so many things to some people but also took away so much for others. Every year people from all over the world travel to the United States with the illusion of fulfilling the American dream. There are those who are able to do it with their families, but some do not have the resources and illegally enter the country, where they have to find a place to live, how to get a plate of food, and most importantly, how to support themselves to be able to bring their family. The New Year is always the start1ng point for new things. new projects, and especially new determinations . May one of them be able to legalize yourself and so give a new year to your family (even in the middle…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: November 17, 2022

Divorce is hard for anyone. The constant triggers and the dismantling of everything you’ve spent years building. Divorce is even more challenging when you’re an immigrant working on becoming a lawful permanent resident in the United States. If you’re an immigrant trying to get a permanent green card and you’re going through a divorce, you’ll need to notify United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). An experienced divorce attorney can help make sure you follow the process to become a U.S. citizen properly. Advice For Immigrants Who Have Filed For Divorce Divorce has different effects depending on your current immigration status. An immigrant’s green card application to become a lawful permanent resident can face severe difficulties due to a separation or pending divorce. To completely understand how a divorce affects the immigration process, you should contact an experienced immigration attorney for help. The Effect Of Divorce On Conditional Residence If you receive a green card through marriage, it will either be a ten-year permanent renewable green card or a…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: August 4, 2022

With the rise of irregular immigration in the United States, hundreds of people have been separated from their families, breaking the bond of unity that any parent or child wishes to preserve regardless of their socioeconomic situation. The World Health Organization defines the family as “a group of people living together under the same roof, organized in fixed roles (father, mother, siblings, etc.) with blood or non-blood ties, with a common economic and social way of life, with affective feelings that unite and bind them together”. A concept that, in recent years, motivated by the diaspora of citizens from different countries of the continent, has been dismembered by the separations of its members. On Thursday, July 14, the U.S. the United States government issued an Immigration Law enforcement directive to federal agents, instructing them to ask migrants about their parental or guardian status during detentions. The move is part of a broader effort by Joe Biden to prioritize family unity and replace former President Donald…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 30, 2022

After the electoral victory of Gustavo Petro, candidate of the Colombian leftist movements, many neo-Granadians began to ask questions about their future. In part, due to the uncertainty of what will be the destiny of the nation that has been governed by the rightist in its previous presidential terms. The big question is, what will happen with the social or political destiny of everyone, and more importantly for some, the economic destiny and guarantees for investors in the coffee lands. Looking for new horizons is now more than a tempting opportunity for many people. Families, workers, students and business people are beginning to value the opportunity to look for a country with economic stability, and the United States is always at the top of the list of those possibilities. The ‘land of opportunity’ has been the destination of choice for Latin American families and investors in recent decades. Jobs opportunities, stability and growth opportunities have led thousands of immigrants to make the move to the…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: June 30, 2022

Many Nicaraguans, as thousands of citizens of Latin American countries, have been forced to leave their homeland in search of a better future for their families. A phenomenon similar to the exodus they experienced in the eighties, during the revolution called Sandinista, where they escaped repression, military service and a not very encouraging economy. The current panorama of the Nicaraguans is not far from that past experience, causing thousands of citizens of the Central American nation to continue migrating to the United States, and in recent years the statistics continue to rise. The number of Nicaraguans entering the country between January 2021 and April 2022 is 141,000, most of them seeking political asylum, claiming persecution by the government of Daniel Ortega. Currently, more than 400,000 Nicaraguan immigrants are in the United States. A figure that in just one year increased by more than 30%, and projections point to a rise in the coming years, with large numbers of Nicaraguans seeking avenues to seek a better…Read More

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