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A man handing a piece of paper to a woman - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: May 2, 2021

The Difference Between Removable And Inadmissible Immigration The difference between these two terms is simple: inadmissible is used when someone is denied entry into the United States; removable refers to someone who is already in the country. They may fall into one of these categories: Living in the U.S. legally (they possess a nonimmigrant visa or a green card) They are undocumented (no green card or nonimmigrant visa) and are here illegally Why are these two terms important for you to know? It’s because of what they have in common. Regardless of whether you are inadmissible or removable, you will not be allowed to live in the United States. Inadmissible This applies when you are trying to become a legal permanent resident (a green card holder). It MAY apply to legal permanent residents who reenter the US under specific circumstances. The grounds for inadmissibility for people who are applying for a green card can be broken down into the following categories: Criminal Health Security  Someone Dependent on the Government…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 22, 2021

If you are a United States citizen and your fiancé lives overseas, you have an important decision to make. Should you bring your fiancé over to the U.S., or should you marry them overseas and then bring them over as your spouse? Factors such as timing, your personal preference as to where to hold the wedding, and expense can all play a part in your decision. Fiance Visa A fiancé visa, also known as a K-1 visa, is issued to a foreign national who is engaged and intends to marry a U.S. citizen. Before filing for a fiancé visa, a couple must show that they have seen each other in person within the last two (2) years. The foreign partner must marry the U.S. citizen within ninety (90) days of being admitted to the United States. The U.S. citizen partner must meet the income level of 100% of the federal poverty line. You must be able to establish that you have concrete wedding plans and…Read More

Close-up of a document with a flag in the background - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 22, 2021

Hiring an immigration attorney is a personal choice. You’re not required to have an attorney, and there are a number of different attorneys out there. Serving Immigrants is uniquely suited to help you with your immigration needs for a number of important reasons. Experience The team at Serving Immigrants has years of experience handling a variety of immigration issues. They know the process and how to handle each step. Immigration processes can be complex, so it is important to have someone who has been through it multiple times. Immigration petitions often involve mountains of paperwork and strict requirements that must be met. The team at Serving Immigrants knows how to work through the paperwork and help you collect the evidence you need for success. Focused Practice Some law firms practice immigration law in addition to other types of law such as personal injury or family law. At Serving Immigrants, immigration law is the sole focus of the practice. This allows the team to hone their…Read More

A man and woman joyfully laughing - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 15, 2021

Under United States immigration law, a limited number of family-based immigrant visas are awarded to foreign nationals every year. Family immigration is the primary basis for immigration to the United States. It accounts for approximately 65% of legal immigration. Eligibility For A Family Visa There are two groups who are eligible for family visas: Immediate Relatives—includes 1) spouses of U.S. citizens; 2) children of U.S. citizens who are under the age of 21; 3) orphans adopted abroad; 4) orphans to be adopted in the U.S. by U.S. citizens, and 4) parents of U.S. citizens who are over 21. Family Preference Categories—includes 1) unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens and their children; 2) spouses, minor children, and unmarried sons and daughters over 21 of Legal Permanent Residents; 3) married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens and their spouses and minor children; 4) brothers and sisters of U.S. citizens and their spouses and minor children. U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents cannot sponsor other relatives such…Read More

  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 9, 2021

Learn How To Prepare Your Immigration Legal Defense Being arrested or detained can be an overwhelming, stressful, and significant event in your life. Though the subject of being arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may be uncomfortable to think about, you should still understand your rights and know how to prepare your immigration legal defente. So if you are arrested or detained, you can rely on exercising the rights that you know you have. Remain Silent You do have the right to remain silent. And this can be surprisingly difficult to do. The reason being is that you will likely have the desire to explain your way out of the situation you are in. If you think you’ve been detained mistakenly, you might wish to express this. Should you not have a valid explanation for why you were detained, do not lie or pass off fake documents. Focus on remaining silent and expressing that you would like to remain silent. Think of this: instead…Read More

Image of H1B visa with American flag - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 8, 2021

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration put a ban on certain work visas. Trump had frozen new green cards during the pandemic, arguing that the clampdown was important to safeguard the United States economy, protect jobs, and for public health reasons. Trump also halted temporary work visas for skilled workers, managers, and au pairs, including H-1B, H-2B, H-4, L-1, and J categories. Revoking The Freeze In February 2021, President Biden revoked the freeze on many visas and green cards, stating that the freeze was not in the best interests of the United States. Biden also noted that the freeze hurt industries and families and noted that it prevented qualified non-U.S. residents from entering the country. While Biden did not take steps to reopen some temporary work visas, the freeze is set to expire on March 31, 2021, and there is no indication that Biden intends to take further action. The visa ban has contributed to a backlog of over 400,000 family-based visa applications alone.…Read More

A woman walking with police officers - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: April 5, 2021

Being arrested or detained can be an overwhelming, stressful, and significant event in your life. Though the subject of being arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) may be uncomfortable to think about, you should still understand your rights. So if you are arrested or detained, you can rely on exercising the rights that you know you have. Remain Silent You do have the right to remain silent. And this can be surprisingly difficult to do. The reason being is that you will likely have the desire to explain your way out of the situation you are in. If you think you’ve been detained mistakenly, you might wish to express this. Should you not have a valid explanation for why you were detained, do not lie or pass off fake documents. Focus on remaining silent and expressing that you would like to remain silent. Think of this: instead of saying something, ask for things. For example, ask if you are free to leave. Ask to…Read More

A person stamping a document - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

Navigating through the immigration process can be extremely complex and frustrating. This is made even worse if you have already had an order of removal issued against you by a judge. This order may cause you to be detained by ICE, deported, and make it so you can’t seek out immigration relief, petition for a status that would let you stay, or take other actions that could help your situation. If you or a loved one is facing this situation, you will eventually have to file a motion to reopen removal orders. This will help you to be able to get your case looked at again, so you can argue for the right to stay in the country legally. While successfully filing this type of motion is not always easy, it can be done effectively with the right help from an attorney. Evidence To Support The Reopening Of Your Case The most important thing you can do when petitioning for the reopening of your immigration…Read More

A passport and money on a flag - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

If you are one of the millions of people who are living in the United States without legal citizenship, you are missing out on a number of important legal benefits and protections. For those who plan to remain in the US permanently, becoming a citizen makes a lot of sense. While it can take some time and effort, it will be worth it in the end. The specific process for becoming a US citizen will depend on a number of factors, including your current legal status, how long you have been in the country, and more. The following steps, however, will provide you with a good outline of what will need to happen in order to become a citizen. Looking At Your Eligibility The first thing you will want to do is to make sure you are eligible for citizenship. Some of the following requirements must be in place before applying for citizenship, and others you just need to be able to accomplish before taking…Read More

A person handing a house to another person - Serving Immigrants
  • By: Serving Immigrants
  • Published: March 2, 2021

Although people may think that the terms permanent resident and citizen can be used interchangeably, they do not mean the same thing. Understanding the differences and how they apply to you, is the first step to knowing your rights and responsibilities. For example, under certain circumstances, you can be deported even if you are a permanent resident. To protect yourself, understand these terms and the meaning of each. A Lawful Permanent Resident This is someone who has been granted the right to live in the United States indefinitely—meaning there is no timeline when it will expire. To be clear, that doesn’t mean it cannot be revoked, but we will go over that in a moment. These people have a Permanent Resident Card, commonly referred to as a “green card.” This is legal identification that displays your photo and status. When you are a permanent resident, you are still a citizen in another country. You cannot receive a passport from the United States, but your green…Read More

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